Thank YOU for changing the lives of 35 families in Afghanistan!

We would like to thank each and every one of you for contributing to our Stop the Suffering campaign. To date, since we launched the campaign in November 2012, we have raised over $35k! With our match, and the current shelter cost of $2k, this allows us to fund 35 homes for 210 people. YOU have made a difference; YOU have shifted the scales in immeasurable ways for these families. They will be able to build homes that will shelter them from the brutal biting elements and provide a sense of pride and hope for the future.

You can STILL make a difference, you can SAVE a life. Please join us in ending this needless suffering.

Change conditions for one family, one home at a time. Just look at how great the impact of your gift will be:

  • Just $80 provides shelter tool kits for four families;
  • $160 provides shelter tool kits for eight families;
  • $447 provides the doors and windows to complete a shelter;
  • $2,000 makes it possible for a family to construct their home from start to finish and begin a new life with renewed hope and safety.
Shelter

A beneficiary family who finally have a home they can call their own!

Temporary Shelter

Temporary shelters that do little to protect families from the elements.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All pics © UNHCR

Read our campaign letter.

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Have you seen the US cover for Khaled’s new book?

We are pleased to share the newly released US cover for And the Mountains Echoed! Look for it at a bookseller near you on May 21st.

And the Mountains Echoed

Khaled Hosseini

© 2013 by Elena Seibert

 

SOS update – schools are engaging, empowering and enabling their students to make a difference

Have you joined our SOS program yet? If not, look to these schools to inspire you to join today! SOS is available to any school, congregation, organization or service group ready to dive in, learn more about Afghanistan and change the path for homeless families in Afghanistan. The students engaging in SOS find fulfillment that is not always available through the simple reading of a novel or examination of a country’s proximity on a map. Contact us to find out how you can join the SOS movement!

Edgewood High School raised $2,000 – enough for one shelter!

Harker School – Interact Club has raised $579 to date; they are on their way to funding a shelter of their own!

Student Outreach for Shelters

Grantee Update:

AFN makes a difference with their Khurasan Learning Centers

We are pleased to share news from one of our grantees, Afghan Friends Network (AFN). In their most recent newsletter they shared the following:

“Five years ago AFN made possible the opening of the doors of the first Khurasan Learning Center in Ghazni, Afghanistan with seed funding from the Marra Foundation and other generous donors. Since then, two additional centers have opened and over 1,500 girls and boys have received supplementary math, science, and English education preparing them to graduate high school. One hundred sixty women have walked in handicapped by illiteracy and isolation, and walked out with the ability to read, write and generate income. We do our best to not recreate the wheel, but to leverage the resources already available in Ghazni.

It is this grassroots approach that makes for lasting empowerment. In one student’s words, “In this hard time, Afghan Friends Network is like a light for us.” Young students are the hope of Afghanistan. We will continue to stand for their education.” AFN

We are delighted to help support AFN’s Khurasan Learning Centers.

Fatema Mushtaq at Boys KLC

© AFN
Fatema Mushtaq at Boys KLC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Afghan Friends Network

 

 

Meet Nesar Ahmad – one of the Afghan street children we are sponsoring through our grantee TIE

There are an estimated 60,000 children on the streets in Afghanistan working every day in unspeakable conditions trying to raise enough money to allow their families to eat or pay for much needed medicine. They do anything they can to make money from selling gum, to looking through garbage for salvageable and sellable materials, to everything in between. These children cannot attend school because without their meager incomes their families would starve or perish from illness.

One of our grantees, Trust in Education (TIE) has been working to support these children by getting them out of the streets and into the classroom. In exchange for their regular and verifiable attendance in school, their families receive a stipend to replace the income their child would have raised from working in the streets and ensure they will not remove their child from the school.

We have chosen to sponsor some of these children and are thrilled to share our first student with you, our supporters.

Nesar Ahmad is only 10 years old and has already experienced more than he should have. His father died many years ago from cancer and after his mother remarried, he and his siblings have been on their own, orphans in an unforgiving land. His older brother has obtained guardianship and supports Nesar and his sister through day work. Since this is not always a reliable form of employment, Nesar supplemented the family income with his street work selling firewood.

Nesar is much like any child you would see in your local playground or school, his favorite sport is football and he loves to study. He would like to become an engineer, and more than anything wishes his family could all live together. Since entering TIE’s program he is now in the 5th grade and is second in his class!

When Budd MacKenzie from TIE made a recent trip to Afghanistan he presented Nesar with a photo from the foundation and a card Khaled wrote. Budd shared that he is an adorably intelligent and mild mannered boy who works very hard. Thank you for providing the support that makes his education possible!

Find out more about TIE’s program for getting kids off the street and into the classroom.

 

Nesar Ahmad

© TIE

Nesar Ahmad

© TIE

04-02-03-trust-in-education

Prisoners of Tradition: Women in Afghanistan

Have you seen the recent documentary, “Prisoners of Tradition: Women in Afghanistan“? If you have not, we highly recommend you invest the 9 minutes of its length to watch what will resonate with you long after it is concluded. The reporter, whose name was changed to protect her from harm, works to expose the injustice many Afghan women face in being imprisoned for refusing arranged marriages, running away from home or abusive marriages, marrying without family consent or attempted adultery. You will meet one young woman who refused an arranged marriage only to be turned in by her own father while pregnant with another man’s child. The boy was born in prison and will likely grow up there, not knowing the inside of a school, the outside of a garden or playground and not able to have any semblance of a “normal” life. It is these videos, these testimonials from victims that further our resolve in doing all that we can for the women of Afghanistan. Our grantees are doing important and life saving work on the front lines. Organizations like Women for Afghan Women seek to remove children from these prisons to house them in safer living situations where they can be educated, have a more normal life and receive psychological counseling. We are eternally grateful to the brave woman who courageously reported this story. We must never forget the women of Afghanistan.

Prisoners of Tradition